Skip to main content

Hope Dies Last: Keeping the Faith in Troubled Times by Studs Terkel, a guest book review

Today's book review is from a guest, our first. The guest is Bea Cotton, a fluffy white Bichon Frise, who has her reviews ghost written by owner Edie Cotton. Both Bea and Edie are great characters that speak the same language — so to speak. Bea woofs in a language called Dogese, which apparently Edie understands and transcribes for us here in her review of Hope Dies Last: Keeping the Faith in Troubled Times by Studs Terkel. Thanks for reading and share your reviews with us by emailing carol doane at gmail.com. Happy Reading!

While just a dog, I simply do not understand the human psychology of denying something that is right in front of you. It’s like saying, “I’m not hot-tempered,” while boasting about pretty much any one human nationality.

So, before you beg to differ, I’ll bark off a list of such “somethings,” in case you human readers don’t understand Dogese:
  • environmental injustice
  • healthcare injustice
  • racial injustice
  • gender injustice
  • housing injustice
  • wage injustice
  • commodity-over-community injustice
  • . . . etc.
CATCH where I am running with this? One is either hot-tempered that these things exist, or hot-tempered that someone has the nerve to mention that they exist. Just makes me want to whimper, “Doggone,” and then chew the squeaker out of my stuffed squirrel.

So, panting to find some hope, people, I picked up a collection of interviews — with congressmen and cooks, union organizers and CEOs, students, immigrants, activists, veterans, priests and lawyers — constituting the alternative American history of ordinary folks. The long short of it: people can surprise you!

So that’s where I’m going this month with book titles:

Hope Dies Last: Keeping the Faith in Troubled Times by Studs Terkel, 2003, The New Press.

About the author: Studs Terkel, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, wrote searching interviews with ordinary Americans and helped to establish oral history as a serious genre. His “guerrilla journalism” was not, however, an inquisition as an exploration into the past. He died in 2008 and wanted as his epitaph “Curiosity never killed this cat.”

Friskily yours,

Beatrix

Rating: Howling: Woof-Woof-Woof!
Graphic created by Manop Leklai from Noun Project



Purchase through our affiliate link, and referral fees donated to Woman of Wonder, a college scholarship fund for women.



You may also enjoy, How I got here and why it matters by Carol Doane.

Comments

Rule


Popular posts from this blog

The Kommandant's Girl by Pam Jenoff, a book review

Once I got into this book I couldn't put it down. As I began, it plucked at me, though, reminding me that this was a first novel as certain ideas fit too perfectly. Mid-journey, it gathered up fully as the writing swelled and the author stoked the fire of the story. While the final chapters felt slightly contrived as characters reconnected, tension rose, fates sealed, and the living left standing had no other option than to move forward.

A solid story, characters you care about and hope the best for.

Book: The Kommandant's Girl by Pam Jenoff

Source: Purchase.




Purchase through our affiliate link, and referral fees donated to Woman of Wonder, a college scholarship fund for women.



Print Length: 384 pages

The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison, a book review

This story about friendship is an easy read. The dialogue, not pertaining to sex, is clever.

The dialogue about the taboo subject runs the gamut from gross, "lying on a hair-filled bathmat with a vibrator," to more gross (read the book).

The main drawback is that characters have an obsession with sex, that's what brought the book club into existence, but healthy male/female relationships don't exist and when the reader thinks there may be hope, the couple(s) disband.

The relaxed conversation between club members, when it's out that the husband of one is having an affair with the other, is less than believable, even unhappy people don't like to share their partner.

Here's the line-up of characters, leave a comment on which one you'd like to spend an afternoon with talking about . . .

. . . Books?

Gloria, in order to have a comfortable, well off lifestyle must look the other way and provide "I'll be home soon" warnings for her philandering …

Prelude to a review: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

I bought A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles for my Kindle using a $5 credit Amazon plopped in my sightline. Not that I thought Amazon was generous. Some time back, Amazon removed $60 of credit from my account after someone named Anonymous tapped in, pretended to be me, did a little test purchase, and disappeared.

Apparently, someone else's fraud was enough reason for Amazon to plunge my account to zero. Hours on the phone with customer service, explaining, complaining, explaining, complaining, explaining, complaining, resulted in this result: Fraud has occured on your account. Yes, I agreed, but NOT by me. All to no avail. Credit was not restored. Frustration was not abated.

I will never forget, but obviously I have forgiven, as evidence, I present this purchase.
In one chapter, Towles deftly describes the main character, the character's current situation, a bit of his back story, and as the chapter ends, curiosity on how this is to unfold pulls the reader into the novel.

A…