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Pieces of Her by Karin Slaughter, a book review

Karin Slaughter’s 2018 novel Pieces of Her introduces characters worthy of being thrown aside, their charms a "trolley car off the tracks." A mother offering slightly backhanded compliments to a daughter who she doesn't know or understand. A daughter who has failed at every corner of life – especially independence, so much so that her sixty-three thousand dollar student loan, with its accompany $800 a month payment (for a degree she never finished), keeps her holed up in her mother's, gray decor, garage apartment, even though her father had offered to refinance the debt, only requiring the needed documents by his artificially imposed deadline – which she, of course, failed to meet.

Enter a teenager in black, his failed relationship his focus, a gun, six bullets, a knife and a minute sixteen seconds of mayhem spins the world of the daughter into unknown orbit. Beyond the borders of "mother" she knows little about the mother, or her capacity to kill someone.

The novel races through twists and turns, wealthy families with so much hate they turn on their patriarch, families the wealthy have take advantage of to the point of no return – killing each other killing the  patriarch. Someone threatening the mom, turning the daughter into a killer.

Edge of your seat plot twists keep the reader on the tracks to the end, but the characters, the bad guys and the good, are infused with odious character traits, and are not people you'd want to spend time with, except maybe Mike Falcone, the U.S. Marshall.

Source: Library Loan, discovered book through online article about female authors.






Purchase through our affiliate link, and referral fees donated to Woman of Wonder, a college scholarship fund for women.



Print Length: 476 pages

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